Flora & Fauna

Whilst my initial interest in the natural world and natural history originally revolved around the likes of birds, mammals and the weather, over time my horizons have broadened and now I try to record as much as I can whilst I am out and about and enjoying this wonderfully rich and diverse world of ours. In the spring of 2013 moths became a favorite subject of mine, and remain so to this day, over 300 species of these night fluttering lepidopterans having now been recorded within our garden in central East Yorkshire. In 2016 I extended my study of the natural world to beetles, bugs and other invertebrates, this opening up a mind-boggling diversity of creeping creatures, and in the same year I also embraced the concept of pan-listing, the simple aim of recording as much as I can realistically identify being a real incentive to keep learning and exploring. Indeed in this period in which we face many threats, be it climate change, natural exploitation, over-population or general ignorance of the natural world, it is vitally important that all of us whom care for the future of all life on this planet work together to ensure that we protect and conserve our unique and precious world, be it a critically rare bird or a lowly and obscure species of fungi. All things in this natural world are inter-connected and inter-dependent and we destroy these subtle connections at our peril.

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PAN-LISTING

In the summer of 2016 I adopted the principle of pan-listing, the simple idea of recording every living organism that one encounters (that you can identify anyway). Already it has encouraged me to study aspects of the natural world which I had previously overlooked, and once hooked the concept becomes almost addictive. However I have never been happy with the idea of chasing wildlife around the country simply to seek a new ‘tick’, and therefore most of my records have come from within a few miles of our main home in central East Yorkshire, or near our holiday cottage in the heart of the North York Moors.

TOTAL BIRDS : 230


TOTAL BUTTERFLIES : 29


TOTAL MACRO MOTHS : 220


TOTAL MICRO MOTHS : 70


TOTAL ODONATA : 21


TOTAL COLEOPTERA : 51


TOTAL HEMIPTERA : 24


TOTAL HYMENOPTERA : 32


TOTAL OTHER INSECTS : 33


TOTAL ARACHNIDS : 33


TOTAL OTHER INVERTEBRATES : 21


TOTAL MAMMALS : 32


TOTAL OTHER VERTEBRATES : 19


TOTAL WILDFLOWERS : 239


TOTAL OTHER PLANTS : 121


TOTAL FUNGI & LICHENS : 68


TOTAL SPECIES : 1, 243

(last updated : 30th January 2017)